Pray, read your Bible, and go to church


Rev. Kevin Farmer - Guest Columnist



Rev. Kevin Farmer Guest Columnist


As I am returning to work after the Thanksgiving holiday I must admit it is a hard loss for me loosing Bill Cline. He was a leader in the church at Claypool United Methodist and was well loved and held so many positions in the church walls, as well as continuing the message of Jesus Christ outside to all that he met. Whenever anyone in our church would get saved and would be baptized, Bill would tell them three important things. Read your Bible, pray every day, and go to church when the doors are open.

— Pray, it is by far the most useful tool in the Christian relationship with the Almighty God. It is sometimes all we have. Many times, we, as Christians, are asked to pray for others who can’t or won’t pray for themselves. However, when Bill Cline told people to pray, it was to be bold in your relationship with Jesus. To pray over meals, pray for others, pray for yourself and your family. Scripture tells us to pray in all occasions, In good times and bad, both asking and thanking our “For with God nothing shall be impossible.” (Luke 1:37). A prayer life is in important for Christian living. When God saw favor in young Mary, it was because she was a virgin and was living per Jewish standards delivered to Moses long ago. I must believe Mary, Jesus’ earthly mother, was a praying woman. Did you ever start eating and remember that you haven’t blessed the food? God will forgive that, but remember to pray when you think of it? It is how we communicate with the Spiritual God, through Spiritual prayer.

— Read your Bible. Bills second reminder to all church folks. Let’s be honest, some only here scripture read aloud on Sundays in Church. The bible is a living Word, inspired by God and the Son over thousands of years, written by over 25 hands and oral traditions. It is the bestselling book and the most shoplifted book in the world. With so many translations and printings available it’s hard not to admit it is important for our history and future. Bill was amazed at the modern advancements in technology that allowed a person to have all the bible downloaded into a phone or tablet, as well as audio bibles for those who couldn’t read well, or see well. Turn to the Bible for everyday answers to life’s questions. Make it a tradition to read to your children, grandchildren, Gods Holy word. It’s not just a church thing, but an everyday, individual thing. Who knows you might learn something, like that Jesus Loves You.

— Go to Church when the doors are open. As a pastor I love this, I want people to come to church, and I know that God does too. The church was set up by Jesus; He personally trained the first 12 preachers and founders of the church. It’s how we experience the Kingdom of Heaven, here, a taste of the full meal to come. Bill lived what he told others to do; Church was a priority in his life, not a sideline. He worked his life around the church, nothing else had priority. Church is a commitment of not only one’s self, but also time, talent, tithes and love. Many are called to be Christians, but few answer the call of the faithful church attendee, it’s a witness to the world of our love of mankind through Christ Jesus.

Bill Cline will be sorely missed, but his word will live on, just as the Word lives on, Christ is the living Word. The Holy Bible is the history of God and mankind relationship, Prayer is our way of communicating with God, and the church is where we go to show our love of God to both church folks and the Lord we serve. Pray, read your Bible, and go to church when the doors are open, Amen.

Rev. Kevin Farmer Guest Columnist
http://loganbanner.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/web1_Kevin-Farmer-Web.jpgRev. Kevin Farmer Guest Columnist

Rev. Kevin Farmer

Guest Columnist

Rev. Kevin L. Farmer is pastor of Claypool United Methodist Church and a member of the Logan Ministerial Association.

Rev. Kevin L. Farmer is pastor of Claypool United Methodist Church and a member of the Logan Ministerial Association.

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