Girl Scouts enjoy some outdoor fun


By Roger Wolfe - Outdoors Columnist



Autumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe and Molly Lamb from Girl Scout Troop 51451 in Chapmanville, try their hand at archery during the four-day camp.


Molly Lamb, Autumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe, Breanna Thompson and Emilee Spencer enjoy some time fishing during the recent Girl Scout Day Camp at Chief Logan State Park.


Girl Scouts from all over the area, and even a few visitors from out of state, gathered last week at Chief Logan State Park for four days of outdoor learning and fun at Day Camp - “Down on The Farm.”


The Black Diamond Girl Scout Council recently held their four-day long Day-Camp at Chief Logan State Park. The weather may have been less than ideal, but Girl Scouts are always ready to weather any storm.

The theme for the camp was “Down On the Farm” and the girls learned about all sorts of outdoor activities centered around farm life. The great thing is that many of the skills they learned can be put to use every day whether you live on the farm or in the big city.

With the weather around the state lately, some of the skills these scouts learned might come in handy just to make it through the summer storms. Speaking of storms, the four-day camp was interrupted several times by passing thunder boomers, but that didn’t deter the campers one bit.

The fifty plus girl scouts who attended the camp were treated to learning all about things in the outdoors as well as some common chores down on the farm. The campers each had the opportunity to try their hand at milking a simulated cow, the real thing is just a little temperamental to be milked that many times during the week.

They, also, had the opportunity to hand make butter and butter milk in a mason jar. They even got to taste and take home some of the butter they had made. MMMM MMM fresh butter. What goes best with fresh homemade butter in the mornings? Honey!

The scouts got to meet a real live bee keeper from the Corridor G Beekeepers Association and learn all about how honeybees make their sweet goodness. They not only learned about all of the protective equipment beekeepers use, they, also, got to see all of the products from the hive and even sample local honey.

What farm is complete without a horse? The scouts got to see the work that goes into keeping a horse groomed and cared for and even got to pet and feed a hoofed neighbor that came to visit for the day.

After the work is all caught up on the farm it was time for some fun. The campers got the opportunity to learn about archery and spent some time shooting arrows in case they had to hunt for their food. They learned about the different types of archery equipment and all the parts that make up a bow.

The highlight was definitely getting to shoot the target. Some even got good enough to use their arrows to pop balloons right from the start.

During the week of activities they learned all about the bugs and critters that live in the streams and rivers. Learning to identify some of the different bugs and larva that live just under the water’s edge was very interesting for the campers as well as the volunteers.

As if that wasn’t enough, once they learned about the aquatic bugs and where they fit in the food chain, the girls were treated to some time spent fishing in the Chief Logan Fishing Pond. Another skill that these girls won’t soon forget.

It was really a great week for all those that attended and even though Mother Nature decided to put on a light show from time to time, the girls learned firsthand how to seek shelter if caught outdoors in a thunderstorm.

When the campers weren’t dodging thunder storms they got the pleasure of escaping the heat and humidity of the week on one hot afternoon courtesy of a few local fire departments. The firemen were nice enough to hose the scouts down in what had to be one of the biggest sprinklers around.

Even on top of all these fun filled activities, they still had time to learn about outdoor cooking, make crafts, learn about dinosaurs and bats, play games and they were even shown how to dissect owl pellets to see what the birds had been eating. Yes, it was as gross as it sounds, but the girls loved every minute of it.

I was fortunate enough to get to spend some time with these girl scouts and I can definitely say they are some real troopers. My hats off to all the volunteers and troop leaders that helped pull this camp off and make it a huge success.

The campers all had fun and stayed safe in the numerous thunderstorms. Safe, not dry, but everyone had a ball. They also learned some valuable skills that I am sure they won’t forget for years to come.

So, next year when that season rolls around, you know the one, Girl Scout Cookie Season, remember there is a lot more to girl scouts than selling cookies. Now, I am no girl scout, but I thought their camp was pretty cool.

Autumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe and Molly Lamb from Girl Scout Troop 51451 in Chapmanville, try their hand at archery during the four-day camp.
http://loganbanner.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Outdoors-Archery-CMYK.jpgAutumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe and Molly Lamb from Girl Scout Troop 51451 in Chapmanville, try their hand at archery during the four-day camp.

Molly Lamb, Autumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe, Breanna Thompson and Emilee Spencer enjoy some time fishing during the recent Girl Scout Day Camp at Chief Logan State Park.
http://loganbanner.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Outdoors-Fishing-CMYK.jpgMolly Lamb, Autumn Farley, Sydnie Wolfe, Breanna Thompson and Emilee Spencer enjoy some time fishing during the recent Girl Scout Day Camp at Chief Logan State Park.

Girl Scouts from all over the area, and even a few visitors from out of state, gathered last week at Chief Logan State Park for four days of outdoor learning and fun at Day Camp – “Down on The Farm.”
http://loganbanner.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Outdoors-Girl-Scout-Group-CMYK.jpgGirl Scouts from all over the area, and even a few visitors from out of state, gathered last week at Chief Logan State Park for four days of outdoor learning and fun at Day Camp – “Down on The Farm.”

By Roger Wolfe

Outdoors Columnist

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